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ArchiCAD Basic Training – Module 4
4-3. Creating the Roofs for the Sample Building

ArchiCAD Training –  (Quick Start Course – 4-3)

This 33 minute lesson shows how to build the roofs for the sample building, first in ArchiCAD 14 (which applies to versions 10 and above) and then in ArchiCAD 15.

Thank you for visiting the Best Practices Course website. The video lessons are available for members only. If you are an active member and would like to watch the ArchiCAD training video on this page, please login to the website. If you are not currently a member, please visit the following pages for more information and to sign up for the Best Practices Course, the QuickStart Course or for the Best Practices ArchiCAD Coaching Program. Eric Bobrow, Creator of the Best Practices Course

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ArchiCAD Training: Creating the Roofs for the Sample Building

Let us know how you feel... (27 comments so far)

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  1. DavidYuguchi
    2 years ago

    OK, I finally figured it out. In the Roof Settings Palette, I had the Eaves Overhang Offset set at 0″, which made the reference and boundary lines the same, and the geometric reshaping would occur when I subtracted area. I had previously manually reshaped the entire roof through the Offset All Edges tool without changing the Overhang Offset and that prevented the subtract function from working properly. Now I understand what you mean by distinguishing between the boundary and reference lines; they show up differently and separately when I reset the Eave Overhead Offset. Now, with the Eave Overhang Offset set at 1′ the Subtract from Polygon tool works on the single element multi-plane roof. I don’t know if this is a work-around, or if I should have known this all along.

    One thing, though, after I noticed that Offset was selected for 0″, and I typed in 1′ for the offset and clicked OK to close, when I reopened the Roof Selection Settings, Offset was no longer chosen, the 1′ was greyed out and Manual was chosen; I suppose this is because the offset may not be precisely 1′, but I do remember typing in that value, and it does seem to measure that.

    Thanks,
    David
    AC19


    • Eric Bobrow
      2 years ago

      David – Thanks for your follow-up comment – I’m glad you figured it out!
      Re the “Manual” setting for offset, it is possible that you have modified one of the overhangs so that the system does not have a consistent offset value. If you type in a value it should change back to Auto; you may need to change it to a different value (e.g. 2′) then back to your desired one (in this case, 1′) so that ArchiCAD recognizes that you want to change the setting for all edges.
      Eric


  2. DavidYuguchi
    2 years ago

    Using AC19:

    I set the height of the roof pivot in the roof settings for “level 1 and level 2”, which I assume to correspond to 1st Floor and 2nd Floor. When drawing the multi-plane roof on the 1st Floor plan, as selected in the View Map, the roof appears properly designed on the First Floor and, in 3D appears to be in the proper position and height. When using the “subtract from polygon” tool from the pet palette that pops up after clicking on the already selected first floor roof using the “complex roof” setting on the roof tool to carve out the second floor from the first floor roof, it results in the roof reshaping itself as if the second floor was not there. Your example shows the roof shape not reshaping or reacting to the carve-out. What I am I doing wrong?


    • Eric Bobrow
      2 years ago

      David –
      There are two polygons for a multi-plane roof: the reference line polygon (which usually is on the wall edge) and the boundary polygon (which goes out to the eaves). To cut out a volume, be sure to press down and start your polygon editing action on the boundary polygon rather than the reference line polygon. (If you modify the reference line polygon, you will change the geometry of the roof; if you edit the boundary, you are simply changing the area covered by the roof.) I hope this explanation is helpful.
      Eric


  3. MauriceNathan
    3 years ago

    Hi Eric

    I am working through the example model roof design to the ground floor roof after i have trimmed the roof around the first floor. When opening the ground floor plan layout it has deleted all the ground floor walls where I have been trimmed to the roof in side the building. Help!!!

    Kind regards

    Maurice


    • Eric Bobrow
      2 years ago

      Maurice –
      Did you ever get this sorted out?
      If not, then please send me the file and I’ll take a look.
      Eric


  4. FranciscoPontes
    3 years ago

    Hi Eric,

    I have also not found any roofing tutorials for the international version in Archicad15. Can you please let me know where I can find them

    Cheers

    Francisco


    • Eric Bobrow
      3 years ago

      Francisco – Please see my response to your other question, lower down on this page. – Eric


  5. FranciscoPontes
    3 years ago

    Hi Eric,

    is lesson 4.3 available for the international version? I am trying to follow the video to create the roof in ArchiCad15 and cannot match the pitch height, etc and finding it very frustrating. Can you please let me know if this available

    Regards

    Francisco


    • Eric Bobrow
      3 years ago

      Francisco – In general, I do not create separate lessons for the international version. I try to describe things in both feet and inches and in metric units, so that it is possible for users around the world to understand and follow along.
      Regarding the roof settings, perhaps a little explanation is in order. In the U.S., it is common to refer to roof pitches by a number that defines the “rise” along a given “run”. A common pitch for residential roofs is 6 in 12, which means either a rise of 6 feet in a run of 12 feet, or the equivalent in inches. In international use, this would be the equivalent of a 50% slope (it rises half as much as the horizontal distance) or 26.57 degrees. 8 in 12 would be two-thirds or 66.67% or 33.69 degrees.
      The plate height or reference line height for the roof is roughly the same as the ceiling height in some cases; an 8′ (8 foot) ceiling is about 2.44 meters, 10′ is about 3.05 meters.
      I hope this is somewhat helpful.
      Eric


  6. MarcelinoPatlong
    5 years ago

    Dear Sir: Please show me 1) how to create Timber Floor Framing Plan, and 2) how to create Foundation Plan…Thank you

    Regards,

    Marcelino Cabot Patlong


    • Eric Bobrow
      5 years ago

      Marcelino –
      These are important topics, although they are out of the scope of the QuickStart (basics) Course. I will be discussing framing and foundation plans in one of the sections of the Best Practices Course later this fall.
      Eric


      • MarcelinoPatlong
        5 years ago

        Thank you sir Eric, hoping in the near future I’ll soon get there…

        More power to you,

        Marcelino


  7. MarcelinoPatlong
    5 years ago

    please show me: 1) how to create fasciaboard and Gutter. 2) How textures of Ridge and valley be seen in 3D or I mean how can Ridge and Valley created. and 3) How to create conplete Roof Framing Plan…Thank you…


    • Eric Bobrow
      5 years ago

      Marcelino –
      I am in the middle of creating the Best Practices Course lessons on Roof Modeling and Documentation, which currently are seen in the Week 16 module. I will be covering these topics:
      fascia boards and gutters, creating ridge and valley treatments, and roof framing models and plans. Look for these lessons over the coming weeks!
      Eric


  8. JulianoMandinga
    5 years ago

    The Roof tool has been one of the many Achilles heel of my learning process. The way you explain things makes learning Archicad enjoyable. Thank you for sharing your knowledge so brilliantly.

    Regards

    Juliano


  9. Derry Shinkwin
    5 years ago

    Hi Eric
    When i select the sections of the roof for cutting out their
    is a green fill comes on how do i turn that off so i just see
    the hip and vally lines when editing the roof basically the
    same as you have appart from that i am realey enjoying the
    course so far thank you.
    Derry


    • Eric Bobrow
      5 years ago

      Derry –

      When you select something, ArchiCAD will highlight it to let you know it’s selected. The appearance has changed in ArchiCAD 15 to be more subtle, and easier to “see through”; previously it was a brighter color that could sometimes get in the way of seeing other elements. It sounds like you have an earlier version than what I was demonstrating with.

      There are some options you can adjust in the Options menu > Work Environment > Selection and Element Information that may help you get a more satisfying effect. In ArchiCAD 15, I can see that this dialog box has an option for turning on or off “Highlight selected elements’ surfaces” and an option for how transparent the surface color is. I’m not sure if you have as much control in whatever version you’re using, but you can go to this area and try a few things.

      Eric


      • Derry Shinkwin
        5 years ago

        Hi Eric
        I done what you said i turned off (Highlight Selected Elements’ )
        much better for seeing elements.
        Thanks


  10. RockyStorm
    6 years ago

    Hi Eric;

    Working in Archicad 11; When I follow your instructions regarding 4.3 Roofs, the roof appears on the ground floor level. Though I am able to follow your instructions and get similar results by making the 2nd floor appear as trace element, the roof is drawn on the ground floor.

    Thank you

    Rocky


    • Eric Bobrow
      5 years ago

      Rocky –

      I just noticed that I never responded to your question that you posted here many months ago. I think that your settings for the roof are different than mine.

      Each 3D element in ArchiCAD has a Home Story, which may be set manually in the tool settings dialog or Info box, or automatically based on the element elevation. You may select elements that have already been drawn and adjust their Home Story if you wish.

      In addition, for many types of elements, their visibility on remote stories may be controlled within their settings dialog. For example, the roof tool has options for showing on Home & One Story Down, Home & One Story Up, and others as well. You may set this before you draw a roof, or select and modify it afterwards.

      So although I don’t know exactly what was different for you, these are the places I would look in order to fix the problem, and make the roof show up on the proper story.

      Eric

  11. MariyaLilith
    MariyaLilith
    6 years ago

    This is a great video! I had found creating mulit-story complex roofs ackward. You make it seem so easy.

    Thanks.


  12. JulianoMandinga
    6 years ago

    I subscribe to a MES program with an ArchiCAD retailer, their classroom training programme is very good. However, this is by far the most comprehensive training I ever had in ArchiCAD. Best value for money, best presentation, giving an enthusiastic dimension to training videos. This Quick start course is helping me consolidate my basic knowledge of ArchiCAD.

    I wish I had invested into the Best Practice course earlier.


    • Eric
      6 years ago

      Juliano –
      Thank you so much for your feedback!
      I love getting comments like this – may I quote you?
      Eric


      • JulianoMandinga
        5 years ago

        Hi Eric,

        Apologies for the delay in replying, of course you can quote me.

        Regards

        J


  13. Eric Bobrow
    6 years ago

    Ross –

    Editing the new multiplane roofs can be confusing at first, since there is a dramatic difference between the effects when you position your cursor over the pivot line polygon (the lines that usually are on top of the walls) and the contour polygon (the lines that show the actual extents of the roofs).

    I did the editing operation you referred to by pressing down on the outer contour lines, then selecting the boolean subtraction option. This resulted in the extents of the roofs being trimmed back, without affecting the current system of planes, which are based on the pivot lines.

    I’m guessing that you pressed down on one of the nodes or edges of the pivot lines, so when you did the subtraction, you changed the pivot line polygon; this caused ArchiCAD to create a new series of ridges and valleys.

    It is also possible that you pressed down on the outer contour lines, like I did, but when the dialog box came up that asked if you wanted the change to affect all planes, or leave the custom planes unchanged, you said to modify all planes. I’m not sure if this would cause the exact issue you describe, but it does cause unexpected changes to the roof geometry – planes that were removed (as when you create a gable end) will return to position, creating a hip condition; probably not what is desired in most cases.

    I hope this brief explanation helps you, and others, who get unexpected or undesired results while editing these multi-plane roofs.

    Eric


  14. RossCahill-OBrien
    6 years ago

    HI Eric, this does not work for me, when I try to cut out the section of roof that is over the upper floor, Instead of it just cutting out the unwanted roof as it does for you, It cuts it out alright but then goes and re works the geometry for the rest of the remaining roof, adding new ridges and valleys, not what I want at all but I am trying to find out how to do it the way you showed but I can’t seem to find the setting, sorry if I am a bit unclear .. Ross